Economic Shortages and Black Markets in Monster Hunter World Part Two: Pre-Endgame

On Thursday, I gave a brief overview of Monster Hunter World, which can be found here. Today, I will be detailing the pre-endgame of Monster Hunter World in order to establish a counterpoint to the economic inconsistencies of the actual endgame.

Many video games contain an element of “grind”, where players repeat certain sections or levels multiple times in order to acquire better loot. And Monster Hunter World is no different as the main gameplay loop is hunting the same monsters over and over in order to get better gear. But what happens when the grind gets to be too much? What are the consequences?

For most of MHW, all of the materials the player needs to acquire in order to build the next tier of armor are fairly easy to get. The most I remember farming a monster was about 4-5 times consecutively and by that point, I usually had all the monster materials I needed and more. This activity can also be re-framed from a time expenditure perspective as most players, especially as the get better at the game, can hunt a monster in roughly 8-12 minutes, so completely farming a monster can usually take less than an hour. Even the most difficult materials to acquire (gems from Elder Dragons, the highest-ranking monsters) have a drop rate of about 13% as gold investigation rewards (which is the best method to farm them). So at most, a player would have to hunt these monsters 7-8 times to get the rarest pre-endgame materials (likely at most 2 hours of hunting). And that is without even taking into consideration the fact that you can often have two gold rewards per investigation (doubling your chances of a gem drop) or that there are other methods outside of farming through which a player can get a gem. All of this to reinforce the idea that the pre-endgame grind is not exceedingly taxing or time-consuming, which is a stark contract to the actual endgame and the basis for the economic inconsistencies in the game.

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